The Successful Surge Behind how Press Brakes Fulfilled its Destiny

The Successful Surge Behind how Press Brakes Fulfilled its Destiny

Our Inability to Stop Changing Things

Blaise Pascal

Pascal Law

Joseph Bramah

John Haswell

Hand Forming

Press Brakes

Brake Press Methods

  1. Mechanical Press
  2. Conventional Hydraulic Press
  3. Electrical (Screw) Press
  4. Electric (Belt) Press
  5. Servo Hydraulic (Common) Press
  6. Servo Hydraulic (High-Performance) Press

Mechanical Press

Mechanical Press Advantages

  • Ideally suited for punching and coining applications
  • Fast cycle times; up to 60 cycles per minute

Mechanical Press Disadvantages

  • Poor repeatability at lower tonnages
  • Requires greater operator skill
  • Difficult to limit applied force resulting in overload
  • Challenging using CNC controls
  • Challenging incorporating safety devices, resulting in a high potential for liability

Conventional Hydraulic Press

Advantages of Conventional Hydraulic Presses

  • It needs only a single fluid power supply powering press and other options
  • Low-cost
  • A proven method with fewer failures
  • The only maintenance needed is monitoring the hydraulic fluid
  • Well-suited for applications requiring punching
  • The ram speed is broad

Disadvantages of Conventional Hydraulic Presses

  • Slow acceleration and deceleration speeds
  • Not well-suited for air bending
  • There needs to be time for the brake to warm up before the operation
  • Open look, ram stopping time variations not compensated
  • Torque tube or tape level needs separate manual adjustments

Electrical (Screw) Press

Screw Press Advantages

  • Inexpensive
  • Quick acceleration and deceleration speeds
  • Simplistic design
  • Very energy efficient

Screw Press Disadvantages

  • When applying hydraulic tool clamping options, a motor, pump, and oil tank is needed
  • The servo motor is more fragile than a typical 3-phase AC motor
  • Gears, belts, screws, nuts, and bearings are expensive and difficult to replace
  • Limitations include off-center bending and ram tilting capabilities and available stroke length

Electric (Belt) Press

Belt Press Advantages

  • Inexpensive
  • Quick acceleration and deceleration speeds
  • Simplistic design
  • Very energy efficient
  • Minimal ram deflection

Belt Press Disadvantages

  • When applying hydraulic tool clamping options, a motor, pump, and oil tank is needed
  • The servo motor is more fragile than a typical 3-phase AC motor
  • Gears, belts, screws, nuts, and bearings are expensive and difficult to replace
  • Limitations include off-center bending and ram tilting capabilities

Servo Hydraulic (High-Performance) Press Drive

Servo Hydraulic Press Advantages

  • It needs a single, standard fluid power supply
  • It doesn’t need a warmup period
  • The technology is proven with minimal failures
  • The only maintenance needed is regarding the hydraulic fluid
  • Adapts easily with high-performance options, including energy savers, high speeds, and real-time compensating
  • Has a broad speed range

Servo Hydraulic Press Disadvantages

  • Not recommended for applications requiring punching
  • The initial cost is higher

Servo Hydraulic (Common) Press

Common Press Advantages

  • It needs a single, standard fluid power supply
  • It doesn’t need a warmup period
  • The technology is proven with minimal failures
  • The only maintenance needed is regarding the hydraulic fluid
  • Best suited for air bending
  • Has a broad speed range

Common Press Disadvantage

  • It’s expensive

Common Metal Forming Processes

Coining

Coining Advantages

  • It provides a more refined and better-detailed surface finish
  • It provides consistent, accurate bends
  • No expensive machinery needed
  • No need for complex finishing processes
  • No springback
  • Forms harder or stronger metal

Coining Disadvantages

  • High tonnage needed
  • Tooling limitations
  • Increased machinery wear
  • Larger brakes needed for producing extra pressure

Bottom Bending

Bottom Bending Advantages

  • Greater precision than air bending
  • Less springback
  • It needs less bending force than air bending

Bottom Bending Disadvantages

  • Not possible to form a U-shape
  • Each angle requires a specific die
  • Not suitable for precise parts

Air Bending

Air Bending Advantages

  • Simple process
  • The reduced bending force needed
  • Less expensive than other methods
  • Greater flexibility
  • Possible to form very thick sheets
  • Able to generate different angles using the same tooling

Air Bending Disadvantages

  • The characteristics of the metal have a more significant influence on the finished product
  • Finding the correct angle is complicated by springback
  • There needs to be an exact punch depth position

Common Press Brake Problems

Anisotropy

Springback

Galling

Machine Deflection

Facts About Hydraulics

  1. Hydraulic power is nearly always generated from mechanical power. Example: A hydraulic pump driven by an engine crankshaft.
  2. Hydraulic power output is nearly always achieved by converting back to mechanical energy. Example: A cylinder, which raises a heavy object.
  3. There are three types of hydraulic energy: potential or pressure energy, kinetic energy (the energy of moving liquids) and heat energy (the energy of resistance to flow, or friction).
  4. Hydraulic energy is “neither” created nor destroyed; only converted to another form.
  5. All energy put into a hydraulic system must come out either as work (gain) or as heat (loss).
  6. When a moving liquid is restricted, heat is created and there is a loss of potential energy (pressure) for doing work. Example: A tube or hose that is too small or is restricted. Orifices and relief valves are also restriction but are purposely designed into the system.
  7. Flow through an orifice or restriction causes a pressure
  8. Oil must be confined to create pressure for work. A tightly sealed system is a must in hydraulics.
  9. Oil takes the course of least resistance.
  10. Oil is normally pushed into a pump, not drawn into it. (Atmospheric pressure supplies this push). For this reason, an air vent is needed in the top of the reservoir.
  11. A pump does not pump pressure; it creates flow. Pressure is caused by resistance to flow.
  12. Two hydraulic systems may produce the same power output, one at high pressure and low flow, and the other at low pressure and high flow.
  13. A basic system must include four components: a reservoir to store the oil; a pump to push the oil through the system; valves to control pressure and flow, and a cylinder (or motor) to convert the movement into work.
  14. Compare the two major hydraulic systems: the open center systems where the pressure is varied but the flow is constant and closed center systems where the flow is varied but the pressure is constant.

Geek Time: The Mandalorian

Full Feasibility Study

In Sum

  • Food industry
  • Automotive assembly
  • Electrical parts needed for appliances
  • Plugs and housings for the electrical industry
  • Defense Industry

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